CE Workshops

CE Workshop 1: “Neuropsychological rehabilitation for attention and executive functioning: evidence-based strategies”

Course Date/Time: Wednesday, July 6, 2022 (09:00 AM - 12:00 PM Timezone: PST -8 UTC)

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Credit Hours: 3

Instructor(s):  Jon Evans

Location: Presential

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Jon Evans

Jon Evans is Professor of Clinical Neuropsychology at the University of Glasgow and honorary Consultant Clinical Psychologist with NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. Jon was the first Clinical Director of the Oliver Zangwill Centre for Neuropsychological Rehabilitation in Ely, Cambridgeshire. He has received several awards from the British Psychological Society including the May Davidson Award, the Barbara Wilson Lifetime Achievement Award and the M.B Shapiro award. Jon has published more than 200 papers, books and book chapters in the field of neuropsychology and has a particular interest in the assessment and rehabilitation of disorders of attention and executive functioning after brain injury. He is Incoming President of the International Neuropsychological Society.

Abstract & Learning Objectives:

Attention and executive functions are fundamental for successful everyday living, frequently impaired by brain injury or disease, and therefore important targets for rehabilitation interventions.  This session will begin with an overview of some of the key theoretical frameworks that aim to explain the cognitive and anatomical systems that support attention and executive functions. The use of these theoretical models in the formulation of attention and executive dysfunction in the context of brain injury or disease will be discussed. There will be a particular focus on the use of formulation to drive the selection of appropriate rehabilitation interventions. A range of evidence-based approaches to the rehabilitation of attention and executive functions will be presented, illustrated with examples of their application in clinical practice.

 

At the end of the workshop participants will be able to:

  • Describe, and appraise, current theoretical models of attention and executive functioning.

  • Describe how the assessment and formulation of attention and executive functions can be used to guide selection of appropriate approaches to intervention in people with acquired brain injury

  • Describe a range of evidence-based approaches to managing attention/executive functions and how they can be applied in clinical practice.

CE Workshop 2: “Social Cognition: How to intervene and what works”

Course Date/Time: Wednesday, July 6, 2022 (09:00 AM - 12:00 PM Timezone: PST -8 UTC)

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Credit Hours: 3

Instructor(s):  Skye McDonald

Location: Presential

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Skye McDonald

Professor Skye McDonald is Professor of Clinical Neuropsychology at the University of New South Wales. She is interested in understanding socio-emotional disorders following brain damage (due to traumatic injuries, neurological disorders, e.g. MS and stroke and degenerative disorders, e.g. Alzheimer’s) and developmental disorders. Her research has both theoretical and clinical relevance. Professor McDonald’s work has direct applications to the assessment and treatment of such disorders.

Abstract & Learning Objectives:

This session will introduce participants to basic constructs associated with social cognition and also some common instruments used for measurement. It will then focus on social cognition remediation. This will commence with a coverage of theory and main tenets associated with remediating social cognition based on the literature that spans the treatment of social cognition impairments arising from neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders. It will discuss theoretical approaches based on principles of cognitive remediation, behavioural approaches and cognitive behavioural therapy. Specific aspects of remediation that take into account poor cognitive abilities and facilitate generalization, relevance and motivation will be covered. By way of example, the workshop will focus on some specific treatment approaches for remediating emotion perception, social skills and theory of mind (metalizing).

 

This workshop is designed to assist you:

  • Describe different theoretical approaches to remediating social cognition

  • Explain why certain approaches may be more suitable than others for different kinds of social cognitive impairment

  • Select the most appropriate approach to remediating social cognition for the kind of client you are working with

CE Workshop 3: “Alzheimer’s/Vascular Spectrum Dementia: Classification, Diagnosis and Underlying Neuropathologies ”

Course Date/Time: Wednesday, July 6, 2022 (09:00 AM - 12:00 PM Timezone: PST -8 UTC)

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Credit Hours: 3

Instructor(s):  Melissa Lamar

Location: Presential

Melissa Lamar

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Melissa Lamar, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Rush University Medical Center, and a Clinical Neuropsychologist in the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center. She received her PhD in Clinical Neuropsychology from Drexel University and completed her postdoctoral training in Cognitive Neuroscience within the intramural program of the Laboratory of Behavioral Neurosciences at the National Institute on Aging. She worked at the Institute of Psychiatry King’s College London and the University of Illinois at Chicago prior to joining the Rush faculty in 2016. Her research focuses on cardiovascular, cognitive and brain aging with a particular focus on Latinos and African Americans. Dr. Lamar employs novel neuroimaging and data analytic techniques including geographic information system mapping to identify modifiable factors that may increase health equity in brain aging. Additionally, she incorporates digital technology into her work assessing cognitive functioning to detect subtle alterations in behavior and pin-point their roots in brain. Dr. Lamar has published extensively on brain-behavior profiles of risk and resilience to Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias and has received numerous honors and awards including Fellows status of the American Psychological Association and the Arthur Benton Award for Mid-Career Research from the International Neuropsychological Society.

Abstract & Learning Objectives:

Conceptualizations surrounding Alzheimer’s and Vascular dementias have changed, for some, over the decades since the original diagnostic criteria for these neurodegenerative disorders were introduced. What has not changed for any, is the fact that the number of people diagnosed and living with these dementias continues unabated and there is no cure in sight. While targeting specific neuropathologies for drug development may make heuristic sense, clinically, ‘pure’ forms of Alzheimer’s and/or Vascular dementia are rare. This CE workshop will not only outline research attempting to elucidate the interplay of these two dementing disorders, but discuss what it means for clinical assessment and diagnosis, and how it is represented in the underlying neuropathology present at death. Thus, while Alzheimer’s and Vascular dementias may have distinguishing cognitive features in the earliest stages of disease, these features are more often than not present together for a more mixed profile of impairment. As the same may be said for their post-mortem neuropathological profiles, perhaps a better way to think of ‘pure’ Alzheimer’s or Vascular dementia may be as two tails of a larger distribution along an Alzheimer’s/Vascular Spectrum Dementia.

 

Within this context, by the end of this CE workshop, attendees will have achieved the following learning objectives:

 

  • Discuss research outlining the interplay of Alzheimer’s and Vascular dementias.

  • Explain assessment and diagnostic techniques for evaluating Alzheimer’s/Vascular Spectrum Dementia in his/her/their practice.

  • List the underlying neuropathological profiles that may be present at death in individuals along the  Alzheimer’s/Vascular Spectrum.

CE Workshop 4: “Neuropsychological Assessment and diagnosis in culturally diverse populations”

Course Date/Time: Wednesday, July 6, 2022 (09:00 AM - 12:00 PM Timezone: PST -8 UTC)

Instructional Level: Intermediate

Credit Hours: 3

Instructor(s):  Rune Nielsen

Location: Presential

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Rune Nielsen

T. Rune Nielsen has been involved in research on cross-cultural neuropsychology and dementia in minority ethnic groups for more than a decade and has several years of clinical experience from the memory clinic setting. His research has mainly focused on challenges and possible solutions in cross-cultural neuropsychological assessment, and more recently post-diagnostic dementia care in minority ethnic groups. He is cofounder of Nordic and European research networks on dementia in minority ethnic groups and cross-cultural neuropsychology, has published more than 40 scientific papers on the topics, and has presented his research at several national and international seminars and conferences.

Abstract & Learning Objectives:

Although a certain degree of diversity has always been present in Europe, diversity levels have increased greatly over the last decades, starting with the immigration of labor workers from countries outside Europe in the 1960s and 1970s, followed by the influx of asylum seekers and refugees in more recent years. Several minority ethnic groups are at an increased risk of medical conditions that are associated with cognitive impairment, such as stroke, diabetes mellitus, and dementia. As a result, neuropsychologists in Europe will increasingly encounter patients from minority ethnic groups in their daily practice.

 

Several characteristics of minority ethnic groups may pose unique challenges to neuropsychologists. First, limited proficiency in the host country language is widespread among recently arrived immigrants and older people in some minority ethnic groups. Second, neuropsychologists may encounter substantial cultural barriers in their clinical practice. Third, low education levels or illiteracy are common among (older) people in various minority ethnic groups. Taking these barriers into consideration, administering a cross-cultural neuropsychological assessment requires neuropsychologists to acquire culture-competent skills and knowledge.

 

This workshop will present and discus how language, (quality of) education, literacy, and culture may influence neuropsychological assessment based on recent research and clinical examples from the European context. Further, several newly developed cross-cultural neuropsychological tests for minority ethnic groups in Europe will be presented. 

 

At the end of the workshop participants will be able:

  • To predict and explain language, cultural and educational influences on cognition and neuropsychological test performance.

  • To critically reflect on the validity and outcome of various neuropsychological tests when used for cross-cultural assessments.

  • To use this knowledge to prepare and conduct culturally-informed neuropsychological assessments.